Unless otherwise stated, the shown objects are reproductions of the original state. If features such as color, object parts etc. were added by us it is noted.


Priesterin The name “Amaga”

Shortly after the excavation the complex was associated with the legendary Sarmatian queen Amaga / Amage because of the rich inventory the person was suspected to be a high-ranking person like a priestess or princess. Since this legend is but handed down already from the 3rd or 2nd century. BC, this allocation, apart from the mythological basis, should be incorrectly. Nevertheless, we have decided to equip the display with this name.

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Literature:
R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.):
Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine, 221-226.


Sarmatische Priesterin-Rekonstruktion Garment

The clothes of the deceased was barely detectable in situ, since the organic substances were almost completely gone. Only some textile fragments were detected. At the lower legs large scaled embroideries were detected, which formed an extremely complex pattern made by gold thread. Here a piece of raffia mat, which lay below the textiles, contributed the preservation of the fragile tissue. This striking component we initially indicated by placing a patterned silk fabric instead of embroidery.

In addition, many pearls and gold tinsels were found, who had served as cloth-trimming. Based on their position a reconstruction of the clothing of the dead could be attempted. So it is likely that she was wearing a tight dress, which was richly embroidered on the forearms.

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Above that she probably wore a large coat with short sleeves, which was locked with a characteristic Dacian bowl fibula from Noric-Pannonian type. This unique fibula we have replaced in our representation with another model of Norican-Pannonian type. In addition, the woman was wearing a pair of trousers made of dark red cloth whose dyed with madder. Such fragments were detected in the knee area. The dress of our presentation consists of a dense silk fabric, the jacket of wool. Pursuant the textile finds of the Great tomb of Čuguno-Krepinka dating at the same time we decided to use color-combination of purple and beige.

At the feet the Sarmatian woman was wearing short boots made of leather, which were originally embroidered with countless small gold pieces which are not (yet) decorated in our presentation.

Literature:
Šamina, Tat’ana (2014): Der Grabhügel von Sokolova Mogila. In: LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn (Hg.): „Goldene Insel im Schwarzen Meer. Die Krim“, 412-417.
Veličko, Evgenija (2014): Das sarmatische Grab von Čuguno-Krepinka. In: LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn (Hg.): „Goldene Insel im Schwarzen Meer. Die Krim“, 418-421.
Kovpanenko, Galina T. (1991): Die sarmatische ‘Priesterin’ aus der Sokolova Mogila. In: Rolle, R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.): „Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine“, 221-226.
Elkina, A.K. (1991): Goldstickereien mit ‘Seidenseele’ in dem Grab der sarmatischen ‘Priesterin’ aus der Sokolova Mogila. In: Rolle, R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.): „Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine“, 227-229.
Bârcă, Vitalie (2011): The Fibulae in the North-Pontic sarmatian Environment (1st century – first half of the 2nd century AD). Ephemeris Napocensis XXI, 7-35.

 


Sarmatische Priesterin-Diadem2 Diadem and Veil

The Sarmatian woman wore a diadem on her head decorated with different stones on which a veil was attached, which was detected by the tiny textile remnants. It consisted of a gauze-silk fabric, which appeared transparent with its extremely fine weave and was colored in a shade of pink with safflower (Carthamus tinctorius).

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The tiara was originally adorned with various chalcedon- and carnelian-beads. Mounted in the center was an exceptional amulet in shape of a frog. We have reworked this beautiful pearl out of soapstone.

Literature:
Kovpanenko, Galina T. (1991): Die sarmatische ‘Priesterin’ aus der Sokolova Mogila. In: Rolle, R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.): „Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine“, 221-226.
Elkina, A.K. (1991): Goldstickereien mit ‘Seidenseele’ in dem Grab der sarmatischen ‘Priesterin’ aus der Sokolova Mogila. In: Rolle, R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.): „Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine“, 227-229.
Šamina, Tat’ana (2014): Der Grabhügel von Sokolova Mogila. In: LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn (Hg.): „Goldene Insel im Schwarzen Meer. Die Krim“, 412-417.
Yatsenko, S.A. (1986): Diademe der Steppennomaden in Osteuropa in sarmatischer Zeit [Diademy stepnykh kočebnikov Bostočnoj Evropy b sarmatskuju epokhu]. Kurzberichte des Instituts für Archäologie 186 [Kratkie soobchenija Instituta arkheologii], unpag.

 


Sarmatische Priesterin-Alabastron2 Alabastron

In addition to countless other vessels, ornamental objects and other artifacts were also found some alabaster vessels in the grave. Due to the lack of infomation about the grave complex in Sokolova Mogila it was not possible for us to determine which form each Alabastron had. Therefore we use this beautiful globular vessel as a placeholder.

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Literature:
Šamina, Tat’ana (2014): Der Grabhügel von Sokolova Mogila. In: LVR-LandesMuseum Bonn (Hg.): „Goldene Insel im Schwarzen Meer. Die Krim“, 412-417.
Kovpanenko, Galina T. (1991): Die sarmatische ‘Priesterin’ aus der Sokolova Mogila. In: Rolle, R., Müller-Wille, M. und K. Schietzel (Hg.): „Gold der Steppe. Archäologie der Ukraine“, 221-226.

 


Priesterin Necklace

The necklace is a replica of a find from the 2nd – 1st century BC from Alitub. Our necklace has big melon beads from glass and smaller, spherical beads of carnelian like the original. The necklace comes from a grave of a rich female Sarmatian.

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Literature:
Il’jukov, Leonid S. (2003): Die Alitub-Kurgane. In: Wamers, Egon und Dagmar Stutzinger (Hg.): „Steppengold. Grabschätze der Skythen und Sarmaten am unteren Don“, 108-117.